Go on, get it.

Friends, my second book, Olympia Knife, is available for pre-order. Though you won’t get your book until it’s officially released on November 2, you will be guaranteed the price and the immediate copy. Because reading a magical-realist novel about a lesbian in an early 20C travelling American circus from which acts are mysteriously disappearing cannot wait.

(I am actually being half serious, since the repressive thumb under which the United States is currently being squished could potentially make The Art of the Deal and Great Again: How to Fix Our Crippled America the only books one can legally read.

You can pre=order the book straight from the publisher here (if you pre-order the hardcopy book before its release on November 2, you’ll get the e-book package free).

Or from Amazon here.

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It’s Heeeeere!

Friends, I am very happy to announce that my new novel, Olympia Knife, is now available for pre-order at Interlude Press!

The novel will be released on November 2, but if you order a hard copy before Nov 2, you will get a free e-copy (multiformat package: Kindle format, EPUB file for all manner of e-readers, and a PDF for other kinds of computers… or, I suppose, you can stare at the thumb drive you put it on, but that won’t do much for you).

(My first novel, Sweet, is also available at Interlude Press–check out their great catalog when you visit the site!)

To get in on it, please go to Interlude Press website here.

OK_front (online only)

(PS, I adore this cover design by Choi Messer.)

REVIEW: Blended Notes by Lilah Suzanne

REVIEW: Blended Notes by Lilah Suzanne (August 17, 2017); 275 pages. Available from Interlude Press here.

Nico and Grady are back at the center of the narrative in the third book of the Spotlight series, and they’re getting maaaaarried. If you haven’t read Broken Records or Burning Tracks, you can still read Blended Notes and understand everything going on, but why would you skip those other two books? Broken started us off with Nico, a stylist to the stars, meeting Grady, a star country singer, and, well, hitting it off. Burning moved the focus to Nico’s business partner Gwen and her life with her wife Flora, and added focus on famous country singer Clementine, who reminds me a bit of a young Lucinda Williams (at least I picture her that way—smart and feisty and full of everything). Blended swings back to Nico and Grady, but Clementine is there, and Flora and Gwen are there, along with their wee son Cayo, who’s there with all of his drool and joy.

(I should make a special note here: Cayo’s in it, but it’s not a fawning, baby-focused thing in which even his diapers are cute. He’s there for realness.)

Lest you think Blended Notes is only about the fantasy of getting married, there is much more to be had (I’ve written about this before—not all gay folk, or folk in general, burn only for a straight-style wedding and marriage or care much about it, except for the significant financial and legal equality it delivers in many parts of the world… in short, a wedding alone is not enough to sustain an interesting narrative in my opinion). (And I recognize that this, on the heels of my “a baby is not all cuteness” thing probably makes me seem like the bitterest old lesbian ever, but I swear that’s not it. I like both weddings and babies, but I also recognize there’s more in a person’s life, or at least there should be, and those two elements are usually cheap and easy story devices to lend motive and pathos to characters. But that isn’t the case here.) The wedding here is neither central (I mean, who wants to read about picking out napkins for more than a paragraph?) nor is it the point. It’s there, but only as an impetus for other things to happen. Also going on: Grady comes out about his love for Nico (well, “him”) in a song, his record company censors him, and he must make the decision about whether to sing from inside or outside the closet, and Nico must figure out how to support him.

The writing is well-paced as usual—and perhaps in this book, even better than before. It might have something to do with the tension created when wedding plans and homophobic record labels and snooping press all begin to make things go awry and one’s never sure whether the wedding—or Nico and Grady’s relationship–will go forward or not. Grady sees Nico sneaking around with some guy, and then Nico wants to cancel the wedding, and it just can’t be what it seems to be, right? (One more page, one more page, I kept saying, which is how I found myself still reading at 2:30 AM more than once.)

All in all, it’s a really satisfying way to wrap up a series of books which follows the lives of some very likeable, interesting characters. I, for one, am particularly partial to Clementine, Grady’s compatriot country singer—she’s been by turns vain, compassionate, weird, complex and interesting in this and past books, and I want to be her friend. On the whole, these characters are not, by any means, perfect, but they are all people you root for despite that (or maybe because of it).